EMPLOYMENT

FORUM FOR MEDIEVAL AND RENAISSANCE STUDIES IN IRELAND
FORUM UM LÉANN NA MEÁN-AOISE AGUS AN RENAISSANCE IN ÉIRINN

*** LATEST INFORMATION: SEE ***
DISPATCHES CATEGORISED: EMPLOYMENT
 NEWS UPDATE: JOB & POSTDOC INFORMATION SOURCES
 
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Skip the prefatory remarks and go straight to the current month

→ To the Calendar, for the purpose of going to a certain month

→ The international job market and other professional matters

→ The roughest of rough guides to the PhD

Freshly-advertised jobs, postdoctoral and research fellowships, funded PhDs, and assorted other funding opportunities will appear here below. Listed in order of application deadline; if there is more than one item per date, then listed  in order of first advertisement (i.e. oldest items first, freshest items last).

 Jobs and so on can also all be viewed here, where they make their first appearance on the Forum (before being hyper-copy-pasted here on the EMPLOYMENT PAGE): that is, over at EMPLOYMENT in the DISPATCHES CATEGORISED drop-down menu.

 NB: There may be a few days’ delay between first posting and appearance on this page (due to intervening Day Job); if Admin is unable to update this present EMPLOYMENT page for a week or more, she will add a note to this effect at the top of this page.

 This present page will be cleaned up at the end of every month … but The Expired and Late-Lamented may still be found in the EMPLOYMENT section of DISPATCHES CATEGORISED, or by searching the site (ex. “medieval job deadline september” – in the SEARCH box, just above the MAIN MENU).

MAY 2014

JUNE 2014

JULY 2014

AUGUST 2014

SEPTEMBER 2014

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NO / OPEN / VAGUE DEADLINE

Assistant Reference Librarian Folger Shakespeare Library, Washington.

Curator of Rare Books and Manuscripts, New York Academy of Medicine, Center for the History of Medicine and Public Health.

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AUGUST 2014

Closing date 4th August 2014

Teaching Associate, School of English, University of Nottingham.

Closing date 6th August 2014

Postdoctoral Fellow in Early Modern Europe, University of Oxford.

Closing date 8th August 2014

Stipendiary Lecturer in Medieval English Literature and Language, The English Department, Göttingen University.

Closing date 8th August 2014

Assistant Professor or Lecturer Early Modern or Modern Europe, Department of History, University of Maine.

Closing date 17th August 2014

Lectureship in Medieval History, Keele University.

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SEPTEMBER 2014

Closing date 3rd September 2014

Associate Lecturer in Classics and Ancient History, University of Exeter.

Closing date 17th September 2014

Lectureship in Old and Middle English, University College Dublin.

Closing date 30th September 2014

Doctoral and postdoctoral fellowships. Lisbon, Portugal.

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OCTOBER 2014

Closing date 6th October 2014

Postdoctoral Fellowship: The Columbia Society of Fellows in the Humanities.

Closing date 8th October 2014

The British Academy Postdoctoral Fellowships.

Closing date 31st October 2014

Munby Fellowship in Bibliography (2015-16), University of Cambridge.

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Once a month and it application deadlines have passed, it and the links to Forum posts will disappear from this page; all the defunct posts will remain in DISPATCHES CATEGORISED: EMPLOYMENT, however, and may be found via the Forum’s SEARCH box (ex. by typing in “job deadline november”). Jobs with no deadline (or an open deadline) advertised after 30 November 2008 will appear here, oldest first; older deadline-less posts may be found using the SEARCH function.

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JOBS AND OTHER PROFESSIONAL MATTERS

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For news about jobs and research opportunities; some offer a sign-up service, whereby you may receive email notifications of new information (generally in the form of daily or weekly summaries, or selections by area or keyword).

IRELAND AND THE UK

For professional bodies, see IRELAND: GUILDS in the list of links to your right and up a bit …

Jobs.ac.uk (academic jobs in the UK but also abroad): one may search for jobs on this site, and subscribe to Jobs by Email for vacancies in universities, FE colleges, research institutions, commercial & public sector bodies, schools & charities.

See also: national newspapers (e.g. paper edition of The Irish Times on Fridays – their electronic edition is not entirely fiable for job searches), and the websites of individual universities, colleges, schools, and other institutions – here in Ireland and abroad. If there is no obvious “vacancies” / “job opportunities” link on an insitution’s home page, go to “administration” > “human resources.” A word of warning: some institutions (e.g. certain Oxford and Cambridge colleges) advertise posts first (and sometimes only) on their own websites.

See also, further below here on this page: JOB INFORMATION SOURCES ONLINE

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THE REST OF THE WORLD (INC. – OF COURSE – IRELAND, THE UK, AND THE REST OF EUROPE … )

On the worldwide job market for the first time? Have a look at this advice on the job market: written for doctoral students in philosophy, but applicable for postgraduates in Medieval and/or Renaissance studies (substituting the AHA, APA, and MLA for the American Philosophical Association).

See also further below: JOB INFORMATION SOURCES ONLINE

The American Historical Association (AHA): its annual meeting is the largest annual gathering of historians in North America, and includes the main international job market (including major European universities). The Association provides a clearinghouse for information on history careers, compiles directories of historians and historical programs, publishes pamphlets on professional issues, sponsors four small grant-in-aid programs, and cosponsors two fellowship competitions.

The American Philological Association (APA, the principal learned society in North America for the study of ancient Greek and Roman languages, literatures, and civilizations): resources on their site include information for job-seekers – their Annual Meeting is also the main international job market (including major European universities) in Classical litt. hum., extending up to the Middle Ages and Renaissance.

The Modern Language Association (MLA; US-based; the main international organization for the literary humanities – English, all foreign languages, and comparative literature): the Job Information List comes out every Friday, and may be subscribed to and then searched; the MLA Annual Convention is – besides being the biggest conference of its kind worldwide – the principal international job market (including major European universities); also online international bibliography (1926- is now fully digitized), style guides (MLA being one of the standard styles for publications). Most of these subscriptions are through institutions. The big issues of the Job Information List appear from about 15 October – 15 November (for posts that will have interviews at the December MLA Convention); there is a second big wave around 1 March – 15 April.

If you’re on the global market and doing background research on universities: the Times Higher Education – QS World University Rankings, the Academic Ranking of World Universitites (ARWU) (compiled by Shanghai Jiao Tong University’s Institute of Higher Education), Webometrics Ranking of World Universities, and assorted other university rankings.

See also: JOB INFORMATION SOURCES ONLINE (immediately below)

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JOB INFORMATION SOURCES ONLINE: WEBSITES, LISTSERVES, AND ADVERTISEMENTS BY EMAIL

The American Historical Association (AHA): its annual meeting is the largest annual gathering of historians in North America, and includes the main international job market (including major European universities). The Association provides a clearinghouse for information on history careers, compiles directories of historians and historical programs, publishes pamphlets on professional issues, sponsors four small grant-in-aid programs, and cosponsors two fellowship competitions.

The American Philological Association (APA, the principal learned society in North America for the study of ancient Greek and Roman languages, literatures, and civilizations): resources on their site include information for job-seekers – their Annual Meeting is also the main international job market (including major European universities) in Classical litt. hum., extending up to the Middle Ages and Renaissance.

Cambridge University Reporter appears on Wednesday each week during Full Term. It carries notices of all University business – announcing University events, proposals for changes in regulations, Council and General Board decisions, as well as information on awards, scholarships and appointments (at this and other universities). Suscribable service available.

The Chronicle for Higher Education (US-based; international academic job market and general academic matters): one may search for jobs, post up one’s C.V. and cover letter(s), and create a custom search agent to receive email updates of new job postings; articles and a discussion forum are also available.

The College Art Association supports all practitioners and interpreters of visual art and culture, including artists and scholars, who join together to cultivate the ongoing understanding of art as a fundamental form of human expression. Representing its members’ professional needs, CAA is committed to the highest professional and ethical standards of scholarship, creativity, connoisseurship, criticism, and teaching. Excellent website for job listings, support and advocacy,  and the splendid CAA News.

Digital Medievalist (international web-based Community of Practice for medievalists working with digital media): some jobs are listed in the “News” section. <dm-l> is the Digital Medievalist electronic mailing list. Members use the list to ask for advice, discuss problems, and share information.

Fabula, la recherche en littérature (the main site for French and Francophone linguistic and literary academic matters worldwide): maintains a webpage of job listings and postgraduate and postdoctoral fundins opportunities (and calls for papers). One may also sign up for their email newsletter (for all news…).

Francofil is the main UK listserve for French and Francophone matters, including job announcements (not just UK); one may search the archives and subscribe to the list to receive updates.

H-Net: Humanities and Social Sciences Online (link to Academic Announcements); subscribable listserve.

Jobs.ac.uk (academic jobs in the UK and abroad – one of the main sites for the advertisement of all academic jobs worldwide): one may search for jobs on this site, and subscribe to Jobs by Email for vacancies in universities, FE colleges, research institutions, commercial & public sector bodies, schools & charities.

Oxford University Gazette contains information and notices on job vacancies and postgraduate/postdoctoral funding. The Gazette is published weekly throughout the academic year (September to July), but not continuously over the vacations. A series of supplements is also published, giving further official information of various kinds.

The Modern Language Association (MLA; US-based; the main international organization for the literary humanities – English, all foreign languages, and comparative literature): the Job Information List comes out every Friday, and may be subscribed to and then searched; the MLA Annual Convention is – besides being the biggest conference of its kind worldwide – the principal international job market (including major European universities); also online international bibliography (1926- is now fully digitized), style guides (MLA being one of the standard styles for publications). Most of these subscriptions are through institutions. The big issues of the Job Information List appear from about 15 October – 15 November (for posts that will have interviews at the December MLA Convention); there is a second big wave around 1 March – 15 April.

The Times Higher Education Supplement (THE): “The number one destination for higher education jobs, news and resources for university professionals in teaching and research.”

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THE ROUGHEST OF ROUGH GUIDES TO THE PH. D

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It is in the nature of the beast that is the doctorate, a many-spleandoured thing in all its infinite possible variety, that it cannot possibly be covered properly here. Nevertheless, here is some basic guidance, which it is hoped might be a useful first step towards your very own personal checklist:

  • talk to your current lecturers, tutors, and supervisers
  • research the application process, in broad terms, so as to produce a timetable incorporating deadlines
  • research – in full detail – funding sources and application procedures
  • find a field (even broadly speaking)
  • research who’s who and who’s where in area of interest. THIS IS VERY IMPORTANT. When looking for a potential superviser, do consider:
    • Do you, or will you, get on? 3-5 years (depending on institution and type of PhD) is a long-term relationship.
      • Advantage of staying with someone you know, or have met or worked with previously: you must be able to get on.
      • If not, try to find out whether or not you will get on. Talk to people. Google around. Snoop.
    • Are they good?
      • Competent in what you’re interested in; but also, ideally, across quite a wide area. Not least in case your research changes course along the way.
      • Are they intellectually active? what’s their track record on publication and conference attendance? and teaching? how do their teaching and research intersect? It’s generally a good sign if an academic is *not* teaching the same old stuff year in, year out; and if their teaching – even, and perhaps especially – at undergraduate level is directly related to their current research.
      • Do they discuss their own work in progress, and discuss and share ideas? Watch out: this shows not just lively intellect / intellectual life, but a generosity and openness that distinguishes a great academic (and supervisor) from the merely good and competent.
    • Are they well-connected and generally respected? In case you need to be “farmed out” to work with someone else along the way, for at least some portion of your research. This also tells you something about them, and about how the working relationship would be.
    • What’s their track record on postgraduate supervision ?
      • Ideally, you’re looking for someone who has plenty of supervising experience, and whose students get their work done well and on time. Not spoon-feeding and mollycoddling, but not abandoning you to your own devices, ignoring you, treating you as an encumbrance, … Like choosing a surgeon: you want someone who’s performed this operation many times, succesfully.
      • With (depending on the field) a good track record of postgraduate placement: i.e. they, and that particular programme, are good at preparing people for professional academia; and they have a good past history of students going into good – or at least interesting, productive, and relevant – careers. Here’s an exemplary case of a PhD programme (one of the top 3 in this field in the world).
      • Talk to current supervisees. This is where going to postgraduate conferences is very useful indeed… Ideally, a supervisor shouldn’t be so hellish to get on with that they have too few students (unless you’re one of the lucky ones who get on with them, as individuals). Nor excessively popular and spreading themselves too thin, with too many students.
      • They should be available, and care, and you should be able to count on seeing them on average at least every two weeks. Depending on how you work: you’ll need to see people much more often – twice a week – and for longer at certain times in your research; monthly or by email at other times. With the right balance between chasing you up when you need it, and treating you like a responsible adult.
      • They, too, should be responsible: on keeping in touch, keeping appointments, reading work carefully and attentively, giving feedback in a timely manner. Reliable and trustworthy, and acting as a good example to you.
  • consult university websites
  • research application procedures for the institutions concerned
  • request reference letters and academic transcripts in good time – i.e. as soon as possible, and probably as soon as you’ve decided to apply for a Ph.D. It is customary to give a referee at least two weeks, and good practice to give them four
  • for institutions abroad: research any other steps required (the GRE for the U.S.; visas)
  • contact potential supervisers directly
  • and apply! …
  • … ensuring you have given yourself a week at the end for collecting materials together, printing, photocopying, going to the post office if need be, and so on and so forth. Having said that, many applications are online and nicely streamlined, in this day and age. Alas, not all.

Useful research tools:

Count *a good year* for all this – alongside all your other business as usual. You may need to count a summer + a year after finishing the B.A. (if applying to integrated 5-year M.A.-and-Ph.D programmes), or count on starting the research process in the summer before you start an M.A. (if applying for a 3-year Ph.D.). Further preliminary research time may be needed for other countries, taking into account different deadlines and more hoops such as the GRE and visas.

Best of luck!

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